Monday, July 6, 2015

Perspective: Pakistan and the three Sharifs | Talat Farooq

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The third Sharif has transformed into something unrecognisable over the years. There are those in this land of the pure who give up on alcohol during Ramzan and revert to it afterwards.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: The News International
By Talat Farooq | July 6, 2015

As things stand today, Pakistan’s political, security and social situations are defined by three Sharifs: Nawaz Sharif, Raheel Sharif and Ramzan Sharif.

The first Sharif is caught up in political dilemmas as reconciliation – a euphemism for scratching each other’s back – becomes more and more difficult to espouse. With the MQM and PPP under progressively darkening clouds, fence-perching is fast becoming an uncomfortable position.

Certain long-overdue decisions – invigorating Nacta, reforming the Criminal Procedure Code, privatisation of sick public sector enterprises – keep hanging and swinging in the air like clothes on a washing line, left out there to dry under a sweltering sun that is sapping the energy of an exhausted nation – figuratively and literally.

Indonesia: No Risks in Protecting Minority Groups | The Jakarta Globe Editorial

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As in previous reports, the commission has found that the nation’s minority groups remain very vulnerable to being attacked, discriminated against and prosecuted.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: The Jakarta Globe
By JG Editorial | July 6, 2015

Yet again we have another report showing that the state is failing to do its minimum but essential duty of protecting religious minorities.

This time it’s no ordinary report of the kind we see almost every month from human rights NGOs. This time the report is resealed by the government’s own National Commission on Human Rights (Komnas Ham).

As in previous reports, the commission has found that the nation’s minority groups remain very vulnerable to being attacked, discriminated against and prosecuted.

The highly credible Komnas HAM now even notes that there is a systemic problem in the state’s failure to provide protection to groups like Ahmadis, Shiites and Christians, who continue to come under attack year in and year out.

India: Daily Ramadan routine a blessing in Qadian

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Children seem very happy and excited to partake in Sehri and Iftar rituals even though those who are not of age may not observe the full-day fast -- but many wants a taste of fasting.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | Int'l Desk
Source/Credit: Author
By Ch. Maqbool Ahmad | July 5, 2015

In a recent article about the blessed month of Ramadan, Imam Shamshad Ahmad Nasir from the USA wrote, "God opens the door of Paradise and showers His blessings on anyone who strives for it." Imam Shamshad quoted the Holy Founder of Islam, the Prophet Muhammad as saying: "Paradise is decorated to welcome each Ramadan from the end of one Ramadan to the beginning of next one.”

Every year during the month of Ramadan, the environment in the town of Qadian becomes paradise-like.

There are ten Mosques in Qadian where special arrangements are in place to offer Salatul-Taraveeh, the special supererogatory prayers usually offered in the late evening during the Holy Month of Ramadan.

Australia: Victoria Police, Muslims dine out to end fast

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After the Iftar dinner Syed Wadood Janud, Imam of the Ahmadiyya Muslim Association’s Langwarrin mosque, gave a copy of the Koran to Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | AU Desk
Source/Credit: Bayside News
By Bayside News | July 6, 2015

POLICE last week invited religious leaders to a dinner marking the end of the month-long Ramadan fast.

Police said 200 hundred people attended the dinner, including more than 60 young Muslims and 50 police officers and employees.

Mr Ashton said he was proud the Iftar dinner was his first official function as Chief Commissioner.

“The Victoria Police Iftar dinner gives police a chance to show respect to the Islamic community whilst breaking fast and reflecting together,” he said.

“Ramadan is also an opportunity for all of us, regardless of faith or background, to reflect and acknowledge the important contribution the Muslim community has made to Victoria.

“The views of young people are particularly important to Victoria Police. We all need to hear their fears and aspirations and take them into account when we make decisions that affect them.”

Syria: ISIS' teenage soldiers carryout mass executions

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They are then shot dead by boys, who appear to be in their teens, before an audience gathered at the heritage site. The 10-minute video was released by the group's local branch in the Syrian province of Homs

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch |
Source/Credit: The Huffington Post
By Charlotte Alfred | July 4, 2015

ISIS released video shows mass execution in ancient Palmyra

The Islamic State militant group released a video on Saturday claiming to show the mass execution of Syrian government soldiers in the historic amphitheater of Syria's Palmyra.

The video shows 25 men lined up on the stage of the ancient theater in front of the extremist group's flag. They are then shot dead by boys, who appear to be in their teens, before an audience gathered at the heritage site. The 10-minute video was released by the group's local branch in the Syrian province of Homs, according to the SITE intelligence group.

Sunday, July 5, 2015

Indonesia: Police Say They’re Too Scared to Fight Religious Hard-Liners

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“The truth is that police officers who see, hear or experience such incidents can file a report [for subsequent investigation], but tend to be scared to because there’s no reward or guarantee of safety for themselves.”

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | US Desk
Source/Credit: The Jakarta Globe
By Erwin Sihombing | July 05, 2015

Jakarta. The Indonesian police are reluctant to crack down on hate speech, including by hard-line Islamic groups, because there are no “rewards” for doing so and they fear a backlash, an official has admitted.

Sr. Comr. John Hendri of the National Police’s legal division acknowledged during a discussion in Jakarta on Friday that there was a widely held public perception that the police were unwilling to take on purveyors of hate speech such as groups hostile to minority religious groups.

“The truth is that police officers who see, hear or experience such incidents can file a report [for subsequent investigation], but tend to be scared to because there’s no reward or guarantee of safety for themselves,” he said.

He did not specify what he meant by “reward,” although it is almost universally believed that the Indonesian police typically demand money from anyone filing a report before they will proceed with an investigation.

Perspective: Love for all, but some actions cannot be loved | Nameer Bhatti

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I would like to see reformation of this behavior, and prevent a destruction to this great country, like that which over took the people of Lot.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | US Sesk
Source/Credit: Montgomery Media
By Nameer Bhatti |  July 05, 2015

To the Editor:

I agree with Jeb Bush’s comment that “we should love our neighbor and respect others,” though I could never love an action that finds so much displeasure in the sight of God.

We learn in the Bible (Genesis 19) and in the Qur’an (26:160) about the story of Prophet Lot and his people. Prophet Lot urged his people to mend their homosexual ways and turn to God in forgiveness. After countless warnings and indifference in changing their wicked habits, God destroyed the town of Sodom, saving only Lot and his family and creating a new pious generation.

I will never hate a homosexual. As the motto of the Ahmadiyya Muslim community states, “Love for all, hatred for none.” However, I would like to see reformation of this behavior, and prevent a destruction to this great country, like that which over took the people of Lot.

— Nameer Bhatti, Muslim Writers Guild of America, Blue Bell

Australia: Free speech and talking about terrorism

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Freedom of speech is easily exercised by anyone, but the need to be responsible with language is so much greater for those who have easy access to broadcast media, and would make laws on our behalf.

Ahmadiyya Times | News Watch | AU desk
Source/Credit: The News Mornington Peninsula
By Andrew Dixon | July 2, 2015

LAST week’s episode of Q&A on the ABC was a disastrous affair with far-reaching consequences. The media furore that followed is difficult to summarise – a microcosm of our national debate, born of the difficult policy decisions governments make on behalf of their citizens.

It should serve as a reminder to everyone that the right to say and think what we want is easily surrendered to fear.

The performance of Zaky Mallah on the program raised many issues, but the aftermath has been short on answers. Mallah made the shocking claim that Muslims were “justified” in heading overseas to join ISIS. Though acquitted of terrorism charges, the young man was convicted of threatening to kill ASIO agents several years ago. Last Monday he managed to destroy whatever remained of his character with a single sentence, broadcast live around the nation.

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